NGC, PGC and Other Galaxies

NGC 253: A large spiral galaxy in Sculptor.  One of the reasons we built the observatory in Spain is because it makes it possible to observe objects which would never rise above the horizon in the UK.   Only 8 million light years from us, this galaxy is 70,000 light years across and has an intrinsic magnitude just one less than our Milky Way.  This image used the QSI camera and Planewave scope and is an LRGB of 60:40:40:40 mins.

NGC 891:  Discovered in Andromeda in 1783 by Caroline Herschel, this galaxy is edge on to us and is suspected from infra-red studies to have a central bar - except of course that we can't see it.  What we can see is the super dust lane.  This image, taken with the Planewave scope and QSI camera is an LRGB of 70:40:40:40 minutes. 

NGC 2903:  A barred spiral in Leo.  This is an LRGB of 110:40:40:40 minutes imaged from Spain on 26th February, 2020 using the Planewave scope and QSI 683 camera.  This lovely galaxy is unusual in that it is unattached to any of the local galaxy groups - it's a loner.  Around 31 million light years away it shines at magnitude 9.0 and has a luminosity of 19 billion suns.

NGC 3628:  Third member of the "Leo Trio of galaxies, this edge on specimen is 32 million light years distant and gravitationally interacts with other galaxies in the trio.  It is the faintest of the three, appearing as a thin, faint line in moderate aperture telescopes.  This image was taken on 9th April using the Planewave scope and QSI 683 camera.  It is an LRGB of 70:40:40:40 minutes.

NGCs 4485 and 4490:  This interesting pair in Canes Venatici, are interacting gravitationally with each other. See how one end of 4490 is distorted by gravitational interaction with 4485.  This image is an LRGB of 40:30:30:30 minutes taken using the Planewave scope and QSI 683 camera.

NGC 4536:  This galaxy in Virgo is a splendid example of a barred spiral, tilted slightly as we look at it and reminiscent of NGC 1365 in Fornax.  This image was taken in Spain on 15th May, 2009 using the C14 scope and ST 10 camera and is an L:R:G:B of 50:40:40:40 minutes.

NGC 4565:  A splendid edge-on galaxy in the constellation of Coma Berenices.  This is one of the brightest members of the Coma I galaxy cloud and is about 31 million light years away.  It is about 125,000 light years in diameter and if it was face on to us it would be a really bright object. Note the prominent dust lane which runs the length of the galaxy.

NGC 5907:  A little sliver of a galaxy in Draco which we first imaged in 2001 and simply never had the time to get back to.  This is an LRGB of 60:40:40:40 minutes, taken in Spain on 23rd July, 2019 using the Planewave scope and QSI 683 camera.

NGC 6503:  This galaxy in Draco is described as is a dwarf spiral galaxy located in a region of space called the local void.  It has a diameter of 30,000 light-years and is approximately 17 million light-years away.  This image was taken on 20th June, 2014 and is an LRGB of 70:40:40:40 minutes using the Planewave scope and QSI 683 camera.

NGC 6946:  A faint galaxy in the constellation of Cepheus, this is one of the class of galaxies known as "Arps". Note the two spiral arms on one side, and only one on the other, but this arm twists around back on itself.   This image was taken in Spain on 24th August, 2014 with the Planewave telescope and QSI 683 camera and is an LRGB of 50:30:30:30 minutes.

NGC 7331:  in Pegasus is also known as the "Deer Lick Group" due to the profusion of satellite galaxies surrounding it.  This image was taken on 3rd September, 2013 using the Planewave telescope and QSI 683 camera.  It is an LRGB of 60:40:40:40 minutes.

NGC 7479:  This wonderful little "S" shaped spiral in Pegasus has a magnitude of 10.8, but a very bright centre, revealing the bar quite well in our scope.  This image was taken on 25th October, 2019, using the Planewave scope on our Takahashi NJP mount and QSI 683 camera.  This is an LRGB image of 120:40:40:40 minutes.